Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps

Reynolds Freezer Paper has a shiny plastic coating on one side that adheres temporarily to fabric when ironed and once removed it can be reattached several times before losing its gripping ability. This interesting feature makes it extremely useful when making Soft Toys. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

Reynolds Freezer Paper has a shiny plastic coating on one side that adheres temporarily to fabric when ironed and once removed it can be reattached several times before losing its gripping ability. This interesting feature makes it extremely useful when making Soft Toys.

Reynolds Freezer Paper showing roll, non shiny/matt side plus shiny side. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

According the directions & suggestions on the box Reynolds Freezer Paper has many craft related uses.

Great for Crafting:
* Protect work surfaces; paints, marker and glue won’t soak through
* Pour paint or pudding on plastic side for ideal finger painting
* Use as a paint palette or to practice decorative painting
* Cover Schoolbooks; personalize with stickers or drawings
* Make non slip stencils. Temporarily adhere the plastic side to fabric with a hot, dry iron. Peel off stencil when paint dries

According the directions & suggestions on the box Reynolds Freezer Paper has many craft related uses. Photo fom Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

According the directions & suggestions on the box Reynolds Freezer Paper has many sewing related uses including the creation of non slip stencils and templates for quilting, piecing & appliqué.

According the directions & suggestions on the box Reynolds Freezer Paper has many sewing related uses including the creation of non slip stencils and templates for quilting, piecing & appliqué. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

Easy Quilt Appliqués
Create templates to reduce time in quilting, piecing or appliquéing. Here’s how:
1. Draw design on paper side of Freezer Paper; cut out
2. Pin paper side of design to fabric.
3. Cut out fabric pieces with 3/16th extra fabric allowance around the design. Cut 1/8” slits on curved edges to ease fabric. Press seam allowance over edge of template. Remove pins.
4. Lightly adhere fabric pieces to material by pressing in place with hot, dry iron. Stitch fabric pieces to background material, leaving a small area unstitched.
5. Pull out Freezer Paper through unstitched area; stitch closed.

Although I am not planning on doing any Appliqué work I am planning to use the Freezer Paper to create Pattern Pieces that won’t move as the fabric is cut out.

Many Toy Making fabrics are either a cotton/synthetic blend or totally synthetic in composition. Some of my favourite Soft Toy making fabrics include Faux Suede & Faux Fur therefore logic says that a “hot, dry iron” might be a problem. I don’t want to melt the Faux Fur!

Some caution is needed.

As a part of a Video series called Faux Fur Know How specifically Faux Fur Know How Part 2 Mark or position Pattern pieces on Fur Fabrics several suggestions/recommendations are made & are summarised below

* Test with a scrap piece of Fur Fabric first
* You only need to lightly adhere the Freezer Paper so use a dry iron set on low or medium heat rather than hot
* or heat then turn the iron off just before use
* Place the Freezer Paper on the wrong side (backing) of the fabric then lay a Linen or Cotton Handkerchief on top
* Adhere briefly. Be careful not to melt the synthetic fabric!

Faux Suede (aka Chamois Fabric) is shown in this example. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

Faux Suede (aka Chamois Fabric) is shown in this example

Keep this information in mind when following the Steps.

Having successfully printed out some Pattern shapes on Reynolds Freezer Paper using the method described in the previous Blog Post Reynolds Freezer Paper Home Printer Experiment in 7 Steps I was very keen to continue my journey of discovery.

But first an admission! The images in the earlier Post were from my second attempt at printing pages…in my enthusiasm to test the Reynolds Freezer Paper I forgot to take Step by Step photos of how I worked out which way up the paper needed to be. On that occasion I used a different Printer (one with a tray for the paper) so seeing as everything was fairly hidden the photos wouldn’t have been as interesting anyway.

The images I will use this time are the successful result of my first attempt at printing on Reynolds Freezer Paper.

1. Print out the pieces

Print the required pages onto the non shiny/matt side of the Reynolds Freezer Paper. Refer to the previously mentioned Blog Post here if you are not sure how to do this.

Notice that the Freezer paper is thinner as shown by comparing the pages side by side. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

Notice that the Freezer paper is thinner as shown by comparing the pages side by side.

Notice that the Freezer paper is thinner as shown by comparing the pages side by side. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

2. Cut out the pieces

Using a pair of Craft Scissors (Scissors for paper rather than fabric) cut out the shapes. The scissors may be used in combination with a retractable blade Craft Knife plus Metal Ruler and Self Healing Cutting Mat to maintain straight lines where needed.

Using a pair of Craft Scissors (Scissors for paper rather than fabric) cut out the shapes. The scissors may be used in combination with a retractable blade Craft Knife plus Metal Ruler and Self Healing Cutting Mat to maintain straight lines where needed. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

3) Adhere each Pattern piece lightly to the fabric

Use an appropriate amount of heat to lightly adhere the Freezer paper to the chosen fabric.

Use an appropriate amount of heat to lightly adhere the Freezer paper to the chosen fabric. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

Calico (AUS) or Muslin (USA) is used in this example

 

Faux Suede (aka Chamois Fabric) with a handkerchief used to prevent over heating. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

Faux Suede (aka Chamois Fabric) with a handkerchief used to prevent over heating

 

Faux Fur with Freezer Paper attached. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

Faux Fur with Freezer Paper attached

4) Cut out the shape close to the Reynolds Freezer Paper shape

Using sharp (for fabric only) Scissors cut out the shape close to the Reynolds Freezer Paper shape.

Using sharp (for fabric only) Scissors cut out the shape close to the Reynolds Freezer Paper shape. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

If your chosen fabric is Faux Fur care needs to be taken so that only the ‘backing’ of the Faux Fur is cut & not the fur pile itself. Special Scissor skills are needed and are demonstrated in this clip Faux Fur Know How Part 3 Scissor skills for Fur Fabric which is a part of the Faux Fur Know How series.

 

5) Transfer any Guidelines or Marks to the fabric

Transfer all necessary information from the Pattern shape e.g. Topstitching guidelines; Position markers (e.g. for nose or eye placements) etc to the fabric using an appropriate marker such as the Water Erasable one shown.

Transfer all necessary information from the Pattern shape e.g. Topstitching guidelines; Position markers (e.g. for nose or eye placements) etc to the fabric using an appropriate marker such as the Water Erasable one shown. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

6) Peel to remove the Freezer Paper

Gently lift the corner of the Freezer Paper away from the fabric & peel to remove entirely.

Gently lift the corner of the Freezer Paper away from the fabric & peel to remove entirely. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

7) Store Pattern pieces safely for reuse

Store the reusable Freezer Paper Pattern shapes in a safe place in anticipation of using it/them for the next Project. A Zip Lock Bag is handy for Pattern Piece storage.

Store the reusable Freezer Paper Pattern shapes in a safe place in anticipation of using it/them for the next Project. A Zip Lock Bag is handy for Pattern Piece storage. Photo from Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps Blog Post

In summary here’s a quick list of the Steps:
1) Print out the required pages onto the non shiny/matt side of the Reynolds Freezer Paper
2) Cut out the paper Pattern pieces
3) Adhere each Pattern piece lightly to the fabric
4) Cut out the shape close to the Reynolds Freezer Paper shape.
5) Transfer any Guidelines or Marks to the fabric
6) Peel to remove the Freezer Paper
7) Store Pattern pieces safely for reuse

Residents of the USA can readily source Reynolds Freezer Paper at a Grocery Store or Supermarket. Reynolds Freezer Paper is occasionally available in Australia at Spotlight (large Australian Chain of Fabric Stores similar to the USA based Joanns). However the cost can be quite high compared to what those overseas would pay to buy a product that was primarily designed to preserve the freshness of food placed in the Freezer.

It is possible to order Reynolds Freezer Paper online directly from the Reynolds website

http://www.reynoldskitchens.com/products/freezer-paper/

or via an Australian based website

http://www.usafoods.com.au/Other/Kitchen-Goods/Reynolds-Freezer-Paper

Being Australian I knew I would need to decide the best way for me to obtain some Freezer Paper but as it turned out I didn’t need to purchase it Online or through Spotlight!

When I discovered that a member of one of my favourite Facebook sewing groups was planning a trip back to the USA to see family I asked her if she would purchase a roll for me while on Holiday/Vacation. She agreed and when she returned she mailed the precious roll to me. A huge “Thanks a Bunch” goes to Allison Dey of SweaterDoll

As I mentioned in the previous Post I am no expert on the ‘use’ of Reynolds Freezer Paper. I learn by doing and am happy to pass on what I have discovered in the hope that it saves someone else some time & helps achieve success quicker. If you have any other useful tips and information please feel free to add a Comment.

Thanks a bunch & keep your eyes peeled for more Posts 🙂

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One thought on “Reynolds Freezer Paper Demonstration in 7 Steps

  1. Pingback: Reynolds Freezer Paper Home Printer Experiment in 7 Steps | Just Bananas Over Soft Toys

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